subvert.com

Anne Thériault on Ghomeshi, Memory and Trauma

March 24th, 2016

If there's one thing learned from today's decision and the words the judge used to deliver it, let it be this.

subvert live in SF 4/20 : Left to our own Devices

April 4th, 2012

Bay Area favorite performer and conversationalist Heather Gold brings her talk show back to the Bay under its new name subvert. (Past guests include: Merlin Mann, Prof. Larry Lessig Michelle Tea and twitter co-founder Ev Williams) Her first live show and soon-to-be-podcast will happen at The Garage on April 20th. This show is themed Left To Our Own Devices and features from-left-field, hilarious writer and musician Michelle Haynes and sculptor and installation artist Michael Brown in conversation with you, the people formerly known as the audience. How do you get a worthwhile education? Michelle grew up in a very religious home and was home schooled and  self-taught, reading everything she could get her hands on. Michael grew up making his own audio-animatronic figures. What lets someone understand they can give themselves a creative education? How do we unschool for this?

Seating is limited. BUY TIX.

(video: Michael Brown's Ghost Horse)

 


my new podcast, subverting SXSW

February 23rd, 2012

Many ask me what happened to your talk show? I've always wanted to be doing it. It's my great love aside from my plays. It's what I'd like to be spending most of my days on. Life interfered somewhat as did the expenses of a live show with that complexity of recording and the state of media streaming on the web at time. I was early.

But things are changing in my life and I'm hungry to et started again and hungry for inspiration and digging into where my heart leads me. This is what subvert is all about.  subvert is the new name for the show. I'm finally taking up ben brown on the great advice he gave me ages ago: I'm going to make this show as simple as possible and go from there. This means mostly doing one on one asynchronous interviews. As membership and donations and the right producer permit, I want to make the show real-time online as TummelVision has been. Then I'd like to grow the community big enough to draw enough folks to make regular live shows possible so that I can mash up larger crowds in conversation in person.

The talk show I want, the podcast I want still isn't online. So I'm making it.

I'll be at SXSWinteractive for the 14th time March 9-13.

I'll be subverting the conference with a mini-alt one of my own: little conversations with smaller groups I tummel together that I hope to record and podcast later, environment/sound permitting.

SXSW is near and dear to my heart. I launched my solo performance career there. I've always done my own shows there but the exploding size of the conference has made the cost of renting a venue beyond my means. I started to "make my own" conference a few years ago when the quality of the panels decreased and the size of parties and the conference in general became huge and moved its focus away from making and innovation.

I'm inspired by my Burning Man campmates amazing RVIP lounge (a karaoke party in an RV) and the general move of the web to streams and flow.

So this will be a show without a venue. A minimally viable show. I'll find little locations ad hoc and put interesting people and topics together freestyle like in the moment. It will be the conversations you *want* to have, not what a social marketing manager at a Fortune 50 company would like to push into your head. if you want an intimate conference and show experience with quality  follow me at @subverting during the conference and add me on Foursquare, I'll include you . Tell me what you're trying to figure out. What is pissing you off. What inspires you. Who you want to hear from and they SO do not have to be "celebrities." Please for the love of the web, give me frickin *people.* Your authority doesn't come from so-called "influence" or magazine covers it comes from your experience and what you care about. I want to talk WITH you.

subvert with Heather Gold (fka the Heather Gold Show) in Toronto 5/25!

May 17th, 2011

subvert with heather gold: an interactive talk show

w/guest amazing actor, director Moynan King and many more
Granny Boots
Wednesday May 25th
Doors 7:30, Show 8-10
Gladstone Hotel, Melody Bar

1214 Queen St W

Toronto

subvert with heather gold holds the honest conversations we're craving
It’s a live and online experience that brings together different guests, performers and you (the people formerly known as the audience) in collective inquiry around a live, universal question or themes. It’s a place to be our whole selves together. It’s a lot funnier than that sounds. You are encouraged to bring baked goods, because that makes everything better. And Gladstone already has booze.

This show ran in San Francisco for a while as the Heather Gold Show.  I plan to launch this as a podcast and bring some nice updates to this site all in good time. If you'd like to work on producing the podcast or have this show live in your town, let me know.

This show's theme is Garden more. Plant less. We'll discover what we tend to and how with director Moynan King (Beauty Shop, Mothering, Proust Project), Sanjay Ratnan and Saniya Ansari (the Torontonians, Mammalian Diving Reflex) and comic Dawn Whitwell (Comedy Girl, Edinburgh Fringe)

L word parody, Heather Gold, Jen Kober, Faith Soloway

February 28th, 2011
 

 

I was just enjoying the hell out of Faith Soloway's hilarious L Word parody (and you should too) and I was inspired to dig up this old image from my own L Word parody with Jen Kober who's gone on to amazing things as a regular on Treme among others. The poster was put together by the talented Tanya Zani and the show won the National Theatre Award from Curve Magazine.

Posted via email from subvert with heather gold

Look out Kathy Griffin and Margaret Cho: I bring twenty college students out of the closet in a single show

February 14th, 2011

Equal parts raunchy, serious, awkward, and inspirational, her routine opened doors for the LGBTQQ community here on campus and opened the eyes of everyone less aware…it was an introduction to the life of Heather Gold, an extraordinary person.

[for the] people who stayed… to talk to Heather Gold—not even listen to or laugh at, but engage in authentic conversation with—her direct approach, her humor, and her interest in every individual was a welcome reprieve from an otherwise generally repressive atmosphere….Heather Gold is someone who deserves the chance to speak to more than just an audience of people seeking acceptance: she needs to speak to those who deny it, because if anyone can raise awareness and support for the  LGBTQQ (which stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning, in case you didn’t know) among us, she can.

 Audra Foster- The Gettysburg Forum

I perform and speak at college campus' regularly, usually about LGBT and diversity issues. For me this comes from the same heart as all my speaking in the Net and business world as well: creating spaces in which pretense can subside and people can be connected as their more authentic selves. Jokes help.

I'm becoming as well known for talking about and teaching how I do this tummeling as for performing.

But I am feeling really proud, and not just because I'm now entitled to a whole lot of toasters. I got serious about this goal of connecting the "audience" in my shows over a decade ago because of my San Francisco peers, mostly early web creators who all often asked "how can I add value." Many performers give people a public example of something, or publicly advocate for rights as comics Kathy Griffin and Margaret Cho do for LGBT rights. I do that too, but since I began doing solo shows (for me these are monologues with lots of dialogue in them), I began asking "what if the show were not about something over there but were focussed on making something really happen right here, right now."

What kind of difference can you really make in an hour or so? You can change how someone feels about themselves in public.You can change an environment.

To be fair this Gettysburg show did go over the hour I'd prepared to do because I was obsessed with bringing the room together and tipping the public balance in the room there so that people could come out. The students were individually telling me about their frustrations. And who were all these people showing up to have abstract discussions about civil rights, yet had real concrete social and personal difficulties? They didn't feel safe. They felt isolated even in a room together. And sadly, many of these students were in their young twenties and had already made it through adolesence without getting to openly feel ok about the feelings and actions straight kids take when they are 8 or 9 "I have a crush on him. Which boy do you like best?" and so on. They were in a small isolated college. Were they going to have to go through 4 more years not honestly connected to themselves or dating or sexuality?

I deal in the unspoken. Now the only student I physically brought onstage is definitely straight. But she has a version of the same stuff to deal with as everyone. Could she say no to me? Could she tell her truth? Not being able to talk about what you're really feeling or what's really going on isn't an issue limited to queer kids coming out. It's at the heart of the breeding ground for everything from unsafe sex to bad bad corporate meetings to dictatorships. It's one of the main obstacles to our being able to be #WITH (an ongoing project of mine) each other, which I believe is our main collective need right now.

So I stayed on stage until it became easier to be out than in. Till these students had someone else they could talk to in the open, or maybe even ask out. I did my best to use what was about me in the show was used to make things helpful for everyone there.

The awkwardness, the seriousness, the conversations, the discomfort, the comic relief was all done consiously in order to achieve something socially. As I teach in workshops and my keynotes, there's an informational flow (or a narrative or theatrical flow and there's a social flow. I wanted both.

It was a funny show. In comedy terms I killed. 

But in life terms, I did something much more important. I connnected. 

We all want to meet more people and feel more ourselves and more connected. This experience inspired me to want to accomplish more every time I perform. I'm a performing aiming for, as Umair Haque would say, thick value. Artists: ask yourself, how can I help? Directly.

 

Video to come.

To bring me to your campus or event, contact my lovely agents at Speak Out.

 

 

Posted via email from subvert with heather gold

Look out Kathy Griffin and Margaret Cho: I bring twenty college students out of the closet in a single show

February 14th, 2011

Equal parts raunchy, serious, awkward, and inspirational, her routine opened doors for the LGBTQQ community here on campus and opened the eyes of everyone less aware…it was an introduction to the life of Heather Gold, an extraordinary person.

[for the] people who stayed… to talk to Heather Gold—not even listen to or laugh at, but engage in authentic conversation with—her direct approach, her humor, and her interest in every individual was a welcome reprieve from an otherwise generally repressive atmosphere….Heather Gold is someone who deserves the chance to speak to more than just an audience of people seeking acceptance: she needs to speak to those who deny it, because if anyone can raise awareness and support for the  LGBTQQ (which stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning, in case you didn’t know) among us, she can.

 

Audra Foster- The Gettysburg Forum

I perform and speak at college campus' regularly, usually about LGBT and diversity issues. For me this comes from the same heart as all my speaking in the Net and business world as well: creating spaces in which pretense can subside and people can be connected as their more authentic selves. Jokes help.

I'm becoming as well known for talking about and teaching how I do this tummeling as for performing.

But I am feeling really proud, and not just because I'm now entitled to a whole lot of toasters. I got serious about this goal of connecting the "audience" in my shows over a decade ago because of my San Francisco peers, mostly early web creators who all often asked "how can I add value." Many performers give people a public example of something, or publicly advocate for rights as comics Kathy Griffin and Margaret Cho do for LGBT rights. I do that too, but since I began doing solo shows (for me these are monologues with lots of dialogue in them), I began asking "what if the show were not about something over there but were focussed on making something really happen right here, right now."

What kind of difference can you really make in an hour or so? You can change how someone feels about themselves in public.You can change an environment.

To be fair this Gettysburg show did go over the hour I'd prepared to do because I was obsessed with bringing the room together and tipping the public balance in the room there so that people could come out. The students were individually telling me about their frustrations. And who were all these people showing up to have abstract discussions about civil rights, yet had real concrete social and personal difficulties? They didn't feel safe. They felt isolated even in a room together. And sadly, many of these students were in their young twenties and had already made it through adolesence without getting to openly feel ok about the feelings and actions straight kids take when they are 8 or 9 "I have a crush on him. Which boy do you like best?" and so on. They were in a small isolated college. Were they going to have to go through 4 more years not honestly connected to themselves or dating or sexuality?

I deal in the unspoken. Now the only student I physically brought onstage is definitely straight. But she has a version of the same stuff to deal with as everyone. Could she say no to me? Could she tell her truth? Not being able to talk about what you're really feeling or what's really going on isn't an issue limited to queer kids coming out. It's at the heart of the breeding ground for everything from unsafe sex to bad bad corporate meetings to dictatorships. It's one of the main obstacles to our being able to be #WITH (an ongoing project of mine) each other, which I believe is our main collective need right now.

So I stayed on stage until it became easier to be out than in. Till these students had someone else they could talk to in the open, or maybe even ask out. I did my best to use what was about me in the show was used to make things helpful for everyone there.

The awkwardness, the seriousness, the conversations, the discomfort, the comic relief was all done consiously in order to achieve something socially. As I teach in workshops and my keynotes, there's an informational flow (or a narrative or theatrical flow and there's a social flow. I wanted both.

It was a funny show. In comedy terms I killed. 

But in life terms, I did something much more important. I connnected. 

We all want to meet more people and feel more ourselves and more connected. This experience inspired me to want to accomplish more every time I perform. I'm a performing aiming for, as Umair Haque would say, thick value. Artists: ask yourself, how can I help? Directly.

 

Video to come.

To bring me to your campus or event, contact my lovely agents at Speak Out.

 

 

Posted via email from subvert with heather gold

Today's Resource: my 1972 Honda 350Four

February 5th, 2011

The thing that makes me happy today is thinking about my motorcycle: a 1972 Honda 350Four. I wish I had a better photo of it than this one of me and Michelle Citrin  heading to a gig in Guerneville on what turned out to be a pretty magical day. At that time we were both kind of creatively stuck. We rode up on the old small highway. We wove on windy roads that were all of a sudden friend not foe, and under Redwoods that seemed so much closer to me and my heart than from a car or even on foot. The night ended up including a woman in the audience randomly standing up and telling us she was a reincarnated Holocaust Survivor, gay men awkwardly trying to hit on the woman hosting the show, a midget dreamily slow dancing with another comic who's 6 feet tall, a random passerby telling Michelle gravely that her karaoke was pretty good but if she could could learn how to write songs she'd really have it made. Michelle will have her first musical on Broadway this year, Sleepless in Seattle. After a woman who sounded just like Harvey Fierstein read our palms we met a woman at about 3am who told us she was a prophet. At that point, I believed her. One thing melted into the other. It was all swooping and smooth and alive, just like the ride on the bike. The Prophet told us this was what she called a Blue Velvet Day.  

I wanted a motorcycle since I was a kid. I used to sneak into the boys section of the library at my school and in my small town and read books about mini bikes and motorcycles. We lived in a fairly rural area and the sand pits near our house were full of bikes and dune buggys. It was all very 70s.

In the early 2000's I took the only money I ever made from start-up stock and bought the bike. It sort of found me when I stopped by Charlie's Place in San Francisco. Vintage Hondas always catch my eye. One of the mechanics told me about a bike she'd just heard about. I found the jacket you see above in a a thrift store in The Haight. The photo was taken for my first cover shot for Where magazine. It never made it. It was considered too gay. It was too much for my Dad too who asked me as favour not to use it. But I love it. And I'm not alone. Its had a lot of press. It reminds me of my bike. Though I never used that much hairspray when I was riding it. 

After my accident in 2006 I couldn't ride and then I moved east when my wife went to medical school.
I left the bike in San Francisco, along with my heart. My friend needs to move it now and I'm hoping there's still a way to store it till I can get back and get on it. I miss driving through Marin and Sonoma county. I miss the warm sun and the golden fields and the windy roads and the freedom and getting the little wave I never knew existed between moto riders before I was one. I miss this time of feeling most myself.

Posted via email from subvert with heather gold

me and Gram

February 2nd, 2011

Today's Resource: sequined headbands + Olivia Newton-John Make a Move On Me

February 1st, 2011

Maybe you need to have been born exactly when I was to find Olivia Newton-John incredibly sexy, or a headband or cigarette-like mic entertainingly comforting.
And somehow there are no women in this dance club. Hmm, I wonder why that could be?
I can't wait… 

Posted via email from subvert with heather gold

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